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Bin-Dec-Hex Demonstrator
 Edit the binary number with these buttons.
   
 Binary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 
   
 Decimal   0    
 0000 0000 
 Hexadecimal 0 016  

What's going on?

“There are 10 kinds of people in the world: those who understand binary, and those who don't.” —Unknown

How many is the number 10? Ten? Two? A computer engineer will say “two” when she is using a special kind of number that gives different meanings to the digit 1 than we are used to seeing.

Binary Numbers

“Different meanings to the digit 1?” you might exclaim! But you know that the number 123 = 100 + 20 + 3. And so the 1 in 123 means one hundred. And you know that in the number 321, which is 300 + 20 + 1, the 1 means one. So you already are used to 1 meaning different values depending on its position in the number: 1, 10, 100, 1000, 10000, etc. as you go farther to the left.

In binary numbers, the meaning of 1 takes on a different sequence of values. Click on the buttons at the top of the page, and you'll see the sequence of values that 1 has in binary numbers. (You'll see 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, etc. starting with 1 on the right side with the values increasing you go to the left.) I call this sequence of numbers “the doubles.”

Using the buttons above, create the binary number 000011112. This binary number has the decimal value 8 + 4 + 2 + 1 = 15 because the four rightmost digits of the binary number have 1s and are represented by the first four doubles. We say, “The decimal value of the binary number 000011112 is 15.”

You may ask, “What about the values of binary digits 2 through 9?” Since these are binary numbers, each digit must be 0 or 1, where 0 always means zero, and 1 is as just described. Binary digits never have values 2 through 9.

Practice

Answer these questions.

1. Which eight-digit binary number has the smallest decimal value? What is the binary number and its decimal value? If you need to, use the bin-dec-hex converter at the top of this page.

2. Which eight-digit binary number has the largest decimal value? What is the binary number and its decimal value? If you need to, use the bin-dec-hex converter at the top of this page.

3. On a blank sheet of paper, write down the first eight doubles from memory, starting with 1 on the right. (That is, without using the converter at the top of this page.) You don't rememeber the doubles? Then compute them.

4. On the same sheet of paper, using the sequence of doubles to help you, convert these binary numbers into decimal numbers without using the converter: 00001111, 01010101, 10101010, and 00011111.

Hexadecimal Numbers

Binary numbers can be quite long for their values. For example, the decimal number 54,321 has the awkward binary representation 11010100001100012. So to avoid misreading binary numbers, computer engineers often will use a shorthand called hexadecimal. Here are the hexadecimal digits for the first sixteen binary numbers. Compare the hex digits of the top ten lines with the hex digits of the bottom six lines (highlighted). Would the hex column be easy to remember?

binary    hex
 0000  ⇒  0
 0001  ⇒  1
 0010  ⇒  2
 0011  ⇒  3
 0100  ⇒  4
 0101  ⇒  5
 0110  ⇒  6
 0111  ⇒  7
 1000  ⇒  8
 1001  ⇒  9
 1010  ⇒  A
 1011  ⇒  B
 1100  ⇒  C
 1101  ⇒  D
 1110  ⇒  E
 1111  ⇒  F

You need to memorize this entire table. Do you see the patterns of the 0s and 1s in each column?

Rightmost column: 0 → 1 → 0 → 1 → etc.

Next column: 0 0 → 1 1 → 0 0 → 1 1 → etc.

Next column: 0 0 0 0 → 1 1 1 1 → 0 0 0 0 → 1 1 1 1.

Leftmost column: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 → 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1.

binary    hex
 0000  ⇒  0
 0001  ⇒  1
 0010  ⇒  2
 0011  ⇒  3
 0100  ⇒  4
 0101  ⇒  5
 0110  ⇒  6
 0111  ⇒  7
 1000  ⇒  8
 1001  ⇒  9
 1010  ⇒  A
 1011  ⇒  B
 1100  ⇒  C
 1101  ⇒  D
 1110  ⇒  E
 1111  ⇒  F

We use the hexadecimal table to find the hexadecimal representation of a binary number. First, divide the binary number into groups of four and look up each four-digit binary number in this table. Then the awkward sixteen-digit binary number above becomes

1101  0100  0011  00012    ⇒    D43116.

You can convert binary numbers into their hexadecimal shorthand using this table, as long as they have 4 digits, 8 digits, 12 digits, etc. That is, a multiple of four digits. But what if a binary number has six digits? Or ten? Then put extra zeroes on the left end (not the right end!). Below, we put two extra zeroes on the left end to ensure that the leftmost group has four digits before looking up each group of four binary digits in the hexadecimal table.

101111   ⇒   10  1111   ⇒   0010  1111   ⇒   2F16   Right!

As I warned above, don't put the zeroes on the right side because then they shift the 1s into different positions, making the 1s represent different values.

101111   No! ⇒   1011  11   No! ⇒   1011  1100   ⇒   BC16   Wrong!

Practice

Answer these questions.

5. On a blank sheet of paper, write down the hexadecimal table from memory. Check it against the table above.

6. Use the hexadecimal table to convert these binary numbers into their hexadecimal equivalents: 00001111, 01010101, 10101010, and 11111.


Copyright © 2014–2018 Kerry Veenstra